Thursday, November 17, 2011

Last day- huzzah


Start of the day - neat as a pin and fresh as a daisy.










End of day - cinder soot and smelly, too. Good-bye, farm, until spring.

12 comments:

Cheryl said...

Oh the dirty apron makes it look all that more authentic. Proper work! I'll miss your work posts and snapshots of the house. Just have to wait for Spring.

Southern Gal said...

I'll miss those posts, too. Something to look forward to in the months to come.

Emily said...

Looks like a cosy last day! :)

Ostriches Look Funny said...

You look fabulous. I am glad you're hunkering down for the winter. It sounds like a brilliant idea.

Elisabeth said...

I just love this! Happy winter season to you. May it be filled with lots of resting, creativity, and family! <3

Leslie said...

Did you make apple pies? And are the knitted things your potholders? Did you knit them?

Jodi said...

Hey everyone! Thanks for stopping by. The end of the day picture doesn't do justice to how dirty I really looked!

Emily, the pictures look cozy but the farm house was so cold because of the bitter weather that some of the children were actually crying. Welcome to the 18th century, lads and laddies.

Elisabeth, you'll understand this, having cooked on the hearth: The ginger bread cake, which usually takes 30 minutes in the dutch oven, took an hour and 20. And the butter I had sitting on a tin plate, on a gridiron next to the fire, refused to soften. It was that cold.

Leslie, the apples were for fried apples, and those knitted thingies were fingerless mitts. The wool was spun by a friend of mine, and my daughter-in-law made the mittens.

Cheyrl, it truly is authentic. Well, as much as we can make it be. But I am grateful for soap and a hot shower at the end of the day. The wood smoke that smells so nice when you start sours later, especially in your clothes and hair.

Elisabeth said...

:-) .... that has happened to me before! Ah, the joys of hearth cooking! It is amazing how long a dish may take one day and another day it takes half as long to finish. How often is there a fire in the hearth?

Jodi said...

Elisabeth, almost daily, but before we leave we must make sure the fire's completely out for safety reasons - no banking.

Kristi in the Western Reserve said...

I'm thinking about chilblains, something I've only read about! Poor kids! You need the winter rest from the farm!

Sara said...

I don't envy our ancestresses their laundry days!

deb colarossi said...

Reality vs romance sometimes..

I worked in a nursery/greenhouse for a few year. During November and December I worked in the 'greens tent'. A portion of the greenhouse where they shut off the heat to preserve the greens, berries, etc. We tried various combinations of attire to keep warm but remain agile . I loved creating urn liners and wreaths and mantle sprays etc, but oh, the aching, the deep can't shake them shivers. We'd pour boiling water into pots of frozen soil to shove snipped branches into when things got really bad. But I loved it. Loved it.

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