Sunday, October 31, 2010

I need at least thirty minutes...

...to get dressed for work. I work as an interpreter of history, specifically the 1790's. The clothing I wear is authentic, not a costume. I love the clothing. It's one of the perks of the job. You don't do this for the money. You do it for the love of history, 'cause the paycheck is "hardly enough to keep you in stockings and fans".

#1 - shift and stockings

#2 - stays (corset) and pocket (purse)

#3 - first petticoat

#4 - second petticoat

#5 - work apron, neckerchief, and jacket--elbows covered 'cause I'm a lady

#6 - shoes with buckles

#7 - cap

#8 - cape--pinned, tied, and ready for work

26 comments:

IslandHome said...

Wow that's a lot of layers! Can imagine it would be cosy in the winter but how do you manage in the summer? My current 'work' outfit is patched jeans and an old tee - all of 20 seconds to throw on but I don't miss those days of taking forever to get ready with suit, hair and makeup. Love your outfit :-) Julia

Sarah Louise Upjohn said...

You have an awesome job... Whatever it is. :-)

Jodi said...

Julia, because I'm wearing natural fibers, namely linen, in the summer the layers cause you to perspire, your clothes become damp, and that keeps you cool. Attractive, no? :)

Jodi said...

Sarah Louise, I work on a colonial farm interpreting 18th century farm life. It is cool.

monix said...

I imagine that putting on the clothes makes you feel really in characte but I don't envy you the laundering. I hope you don't have to use 1790 wash tub and soap! They do look splendid, though.

em said...

Lovely!
Not showing your elbows, reminds me of Laura Ingalls Wilder, that somewhere in her books said that she'd never seen her mothers ears.
That was obviously long before you could show any part of your body without blushing.
Margaretha

Tamara @ Living Palm said...

delightful post!

Leslie said...

You're simply adorable. Did you know that? I can see why you need 30 minutes to get dressed in the morning! The corset alone would probably take me 30 minutes.

Love the mirror, by the way...

And I loved that story you told about your son and the nursery rhyme. Such a sweet memory.

Jodi said...

monix, I have, actually, demonstrated the washing methods on the farm. Hot cauldron, lye soap; wringing out and then drying on the bushes. Not easy, considering one petticoat is three yards of fabric. However, at home, I use the delicate cycle and the mild soap, then line dry. I wash my outfits more often than an 18th century servant would because when I get home, my clothes stink of wood smoke and other matter of farm life. :D

Jodi said...

em, quite true, although I'm sure SOME women did.

Tamara, thank you.

Jodi said...

Leslie, it used to take me 45 minutes! I'm getting quicker. The stays are laced up the back; my husband or daughter usually help me. I couldn't do it alone, no way. Thanks :)

Leslie said...

Some 18th century woman just quoted from "Napolean Dynamite" on my blog. Any idea who she could be? And can I just say that I love her sense of humor?

Vicki said...

i would have never made it in 1790. that is a lot of clothing! xo

Kerrie said...

wow, thanks for posting this! We're taking the kids to Plymouth Plantation on Thursday, I can't wait!

Niamh said...

My dear, never mind the elbows when you are being so free showing off your shift and stays...the indecency!

Southern Gal said...

Love it! We're going to Revolutionary War Field Days this weekend. Love walking around the tents, campfires and demonstration booths while breathing in history. It usually ends up being super hot here when it happens plus the war reenactors have to fight the fire ants when they "die" on the field.

Jodi said...

Niamh, shameless, I know. xo

Jodi said...

Southern Gal, I had to die once in the French and Indian war reenactment. It was a hot day, and I could feel bugs crawling on me. Thank heavens they weren't fire ants!

Ostriches Look Funny said...

YOU are a lady. I love it! I always get so excited about your work, you transform into a colonial woman who still knows how to use a computer! I can't get over the magic of it all. :)

Chelsey said...

This is amazing!

I'm wondering is the shift what they would wear to bed too? If so, would they dress overtop of the one they wore to bed the night before or would they change into a "daytime" one?

Who worries about bare elbows with a plummeting neckline like that?!?!

Jodi said...

Chelsey, yes, they'd wear the shift to bed and then dress overtop of it the next day. The neck-kerchief takes care of any plummeting.

Kristi in the Western Reserve said...

Wonderful!I have a friend who does revolutionary war reenactments (she's the cook) and she wondered where you work. (And liked the way you dress for work.) What's the name of the park you are with? I'll check back and see if you have answered this. Thanks.

Jodi said...

Krisit, Colonial Pennsylvania Plantation. :)

cheryl said...

What a work up at the beginning of the day. Somehow I'm feeling better about the amount of time it takes to get everyone dressed and ready for school, in our house. No corsets involved. How do you get to the pocket?

Jodi said...

cheryl, it's a bit awkward, but there's a slit in both petticoats, and you have to make sure that the pocket is lined up with the slits. some women wear their pockets outside the petticoats, but some clothing historians say that would've been considered vulgar.

Emily Young said...

I love this! When I was little, I had the American Girl doll Felicity, and I used to dress her in her shift and pockets and petticoats and buckle shoes. Such fun clothes : )

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails