Sunday, January 5, 2014

This little light of mine

Lookee what I got for Christmas!  A colonial style mold for taper candles.  For awhile now, I've been collecting beeswax from our hives, and this is just the type of mold I had hoped for.  Now let me start by saying I usually find making things to be relaxing.  BUT NOT THIS TIME!!  


Threading the wick through this thing was a -----.  Well, let's just say it could provoke undignified language, (which would certainly dim this little light of mine *ahem*). 
   

Especially when you have to KEEP re-threading it until you get it right. After I few deep breaths, I realized that candle making has the ability to evoke the fruit of patience. 


I learned something cool in the process:  the difference between fruit and candles is that you cannot make fruit, though you can bear it...


...but you can make candles - if you can bear it.


Four of the candles popped out easily.  Two are still stuck.  There's an enlightening lesson in there somewhere.

Patience.


Even though the making is not easy, it is worth it.  No turning back.  This little light of mine, la la la....


24 comments:

Stephanie Ann said...

Oh but they look lovely and I bet they smell wonderful!

Ron and Theresa said...

How do you thread the wick?. Place the mold in the freezer overnight and they should pop out in the morning

JoAnn Hallum said...

you are too much. Something very sparkly shines through when you write. Probably your light. :)

Amy said...

you clever lady you! the bearing fruit part:) JUST today they did an article on the benefits of beeswax candles in the KC Star newspaper. So, I'd just told my husband I want a beeswax candle for my birthday this week. So, then I come here and see THIS! I must be on the right track. Hope you had a wonderful holiday and blessings in 2014!

Jody Lee Collins said...

Jodi you're an inspiration with your stick-to-it-iveness and your decision to choose patience DOES make your light shine.

What a fun read--the butcher, the baker, the candle stick maker....those were some real jobs way back in the day, hey?

angelina said...

They are beautiful Jodi , and you make me laugh. hahaha. Happy new year , friend. xx

Linda said...

Very impressive! Must be wonderful to be able to make your own candles from wax produced by your own bees. Candles are so expensive! and beeswax candles are the best. Congratulations!

Val , Kate, The Cute Kitten ,Razzy, Kepsey,Darwin ,Charon and Echo. said...

I fell about reading this... are the remaining candles still stuck?

You'll just have to develop a vocabulary that allows for invention..I used to know a girl who used to burst out with "Oh Sausages" worked for her...I'm afraid I tend to be a bit more Anglo Saxon I'm afraid ... but "drat and fiddlesticks" does work in a pinch :0)

elizabeyta said...

So pretty! I have wanted to try candle making but I was just going to try the dipping method.

Joy Lake said...

Love the quote about fruit and candles. I feel your pain, using metallic embroidery thread elicits similar feelings.

Kristi in the Western Reserve said...

What a great mold....I'm wondering how many candles a woman would need to make for her household. I actually don't know enough about the amounts and types of lighting people would have used. And I'm sure it differed with social classes....And how many people had that much beeswax? Lots of things to think about. And you are a great inspiration to creativity, to patience, to many things, Jodi!

Could you dip the mold into hot water to loosen the candles?

Jodi said...

Kristi, I had to put the mold in the oven to melt the wax out. It just wasn't going to come any other way.

Jodi said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jodi said...

Theresa, you thread the wick with wire that will rip out about 100 times before it works.

Jodi said...

Val, nope, not anymore. Fiddlesticks!

Jodi said...

Thank you everyone for visiting!xox

Cheryl said...

Wonderful to make your own beeswax candles. Great moulds. I need to look out for some of those.
I was looking over one of our old house deeds and it was signed by a tallow chandler. Only signed with a cross. Makes me think how candle making was so much more part of daily life for our ancestors. Happy new year.

Leslie said...

Oh, they look gorgeous! (I would NEVER have the patience to thread that wick 100 times.)

I'm also in love with your pottery creamers in different colors. Did you get them from a local potter?

Jodi said...

Cheryl, happy new year to you! That is so cool. The deed to your house, I mean. What history!

Jodi said...

Leslie, those are water pitchers. The green and black ones were made by a potter at my school. The clay one was made by someone where I used to work.

Anonymous said...

Your candles looks beautiful. There is little that is more authentic than the look, feel, and aroma of a handmade beeswax candle. Bravo, kudos, persevere! :-)

Jodi said...

Anon, Thank you!

Helen said...

Haha Jodi, I can just picture you... Enjoy burning your fruit!

Eve said...

These candles are so nice, I can almost smell them.

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